Working with the Ponca Agriculture dept. A summation of experiences.
August 2, 2014

A handful of history
A handful of history
7/29/14

I first stepped onto this farm after midnight on May 29th 2014. Though I had some idea of what to expect, there was much I didn’t. From the kindness of the people I have worked with, to some of the skills I have learned. Just today seven Long Horn were brought to the farm. Though they are only going to be here a few weeks before being butchered, They will provide meat for the Ponca Powwow at the end of August. Till then, I’ll be helping in their care and learning about them. There have been a lot of learning experiences during these last eight weeks.. Many trials, but nothing that I could view as a failure. There may be things I need to work on. Self confidence being one of them, but I am making progress. I am becoming stronger One of the other things I helped with is planting some of the Blue and Sweet corn the Ponca cultivated in their original homeland of Nebraska. Currently it is tasseling and there are little ears starting on most of the plants. To be part of that left me excited and in awe. To hold part of a history of a people in one’s hand. To nurture it and watch it grow, is something that can never be adequately described. It must be experienced to truly understand. I am even more in awe of Amos Hinton who tracked down each variety on his own. Certainly this was not an easy venture. It took time, patience, love and driving many miles to bring all but one of the varieties back Just after I arrived, he and some of the workers went to Nebraska to plant the Red Ponca corn. Since then, I’ve heard it’s doing well. Below is an article Where Amos talks on the corn. Also shares the variety he still searches for.

http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/07/19/ponca-and-pawnee-nations-drive-preserve-ancestral-corn-155940

My experiences with my Supervisor have been very positive. Anita has been kind, understanding and informative. She has been the perfect balance of nurturing and encouraging when I came to something I was unsure of. I am now more confident in many of the day to day workings of the farm. Part of that is through her guidance some from myself. I have also found great experiences with Ogallala Commons. They have been available when needed, and have made this internship a positive experience. I am most thankful and grateful for the opportunity they have given me in this internship. It just proves in many cases city can survive and thrive in the country if given a chance. Thank you Ogallala Commons for giving me that chance.

Some of the tomato crop.
Some of the tomato crop.