Welcome to the Market
August 4, 2019

Starting with my internship at a market that I have worked at for so long was like learning to walk again. I was used to dealing out money, counting it back, adding numbers, and doing so quickly as to not disturb the wanting beast(the customer). Now, however, money has lost its meaning, leaving actions as currency. Showing a vendor to their booth- carrying their tent guarantees the offer of a free smoothie, or a more generous donation to our local food donation program(that we help facilitate). In fact the kindness that has always been apparent at our market seems so much greater when one has removed the capitalism. The economic battlefield is leveled when one has no need to gain, yet gain is inevitable when neither want, nor need are present. Daily, I wonder if such a system of want is needed, as it is apparent that the consumer feeds on the impoverished producer, their want for a more leaning system towards them is apparent only when it is the small business that they speak towards, leaving the monster that is big business to preside over the people as if it were a god. Anyways, that’s just something that I’ve been mulling over. Beginning this market I wished to connect with my fellow volunteers and interns; since then I have learned much more than their names, which I see as a success. I have since entertained children with bubbles and adults with my love of public radio(minus one, who’s grasp on the stations economics seemed lacking). My experience in these 60-odd hours was nothing if not pleasant, though I do with to learn more about my fellows, the aspen mine center(which provides us with our food donation program), and to learn more about the small businesses that make our market work.

One of my projects this year allows for customers to buy and donate food to the longer table as to relieve the vendors of some of the weight of donating large amounts of food.
A basket full of food, donated entirely by customers(becoming one of the many boxes of food donated this month by vendors and customers).
Sandra, another market intern, valiantly attempting to hide behind a baguette.